Podcast Builder Club
Podcast Builder Club

Episode 26 · 1 year ago

Monetizing Your Podcast With Courses Feat. Molly Ruland

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Podcasters are always looking for ways to monetize their podcasts. For a lot of people, this traditionally means finding a sponsor and inserting awkward ad breaks into their podcasts. But there are many ways you can monetize on your own terms, without a sponsor. One great way to do this is by creating a course that can turn into passive income for you for years to come.

In this episode, Travis chats with Molly Ruland, a course-creation expert, who shares:

  • How to monetize your podcast with a course: She breaks down how to reverse-engineer a course that supports your goals, how to find out what people want to know, and how to hook people into joining.
  • Her favorite podcasting tools: These include some life-changing book recommendations and using handy websites like Trello and Learndash to create a course portal.
  • Common mistakes she sees people make when creating their first course: It’s important to find a balance of doing your due diligence to create a course that your audience will actually want to take, but not getting paralyzed by perfectionism.

Memorable Quotes:

  • "Monetizing through your own course is similar to investing in your audience as opposed to creating your business off the back of another business"
  • “You have specific knowledge that people ask you about all the time. Why not turn that into something that can make you money?”
  • “Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good”

Links to resources:

Go to https://www.heartcastmedia.com/ to schedule a call with guest Molly Ruland who can help you build a course for your podcast.

Go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/poddecks to join the Podcast Builder Club!


Go to https://www.poddecks.com/ to give your interviews a unique twist!

Hey podcasters. Today I've got mollyrouland on the podcast from heartcast media. She's an expert at creating courses andin this episode we talk about how you can monetize your podcast with a course, her favorite podcasting tools and mistakes new content creators make when they make theirfirst course. So if you're considering making a course to monetize your podcast,you're not going to want to miss this episode. Now, before we jumpin, I've got a whole free workshop on three ways you can monetize yourpodcast without a sponsor. One of those ways is by creating your very owncourse. Now you could check that out for free at podcast builder clubcom.Now let's get into this episode. We've got a ton of awesome nuggets foryou to learn today on podcast therapy. PODCASTERS are oftentimes trying to monetize,right. That's one of the biggest things that they're trying to do in theirpodcast and you are an expert on monetizing through courses. Can you talk aboutwhy you think monetizing through a course is extremely important for podcasters? Well,because I think it's boils down to like the value of your content, thevalue of your listeners, right. So if you have two hundred, youknow, rapid fans, or whatever the current buzz or it is right,like who has more value, those two hundred people who want more from you, or potentially a corporate sponsor and a big check? Like which one's morerealistic? Which one has more value, which one has more longevity? Youknow, all money isn't good money, right. So, you know,Joe Rogan right just made a super deal with spotify, but like there's definitelygrumblings about whether or not he's happy because they're censoring him, right, whichis like it doesn't matter how you feel about Joe Rogan, but that's themost UN Joe Rogan thing you can do is sensor Joe Rogan exactly. Youknow, what are we doing? Okay, so, yeah, so monetizing throughyour own course is similar to just investing in your audience. Is opposedto creating your business off the back of another business, exactly because you knowyou're always going to be at the whim of the company and they don't alwaysknow what it is they want. And I also feel, you know,honestly, there's so much like highway robbery going on with all these like dynamicallyinserted ads. Like I'm not interested in that. I think it's poor placementa lot of times. Like what if they drop an ad and like rightin the middle of a really emotional conversation and it's inappropriate? What if itdoesn't really match the VIBE and you're just getting robbed because they're going to gooff of like old school spins, you know what I mean? Like Icall them spins, plays, download streams, whatever you want to call them,right, but like they're going to give you like four cents. We'relike, you know, a partnership with somebody locally or a course or amastermind or some extension of your content is going to yield you so much betterresults than I couldn't agree right with you. I couldn't agree with more with you. And and I think obviously podcast or they want to grow their audienceand I think a lot of them think that the sponsorship route is the bestway to go. And I'm super excited...

...to have you on because I've beenpromoting different ways to monetize without a sponsor, one of which is creating your core. So how do you figure out? How can a podcaster figure out whattheir course should be? Well, I can tell you how I figuredout mine. Right, I started doing a lot of like podcasting, onehund and one events where people could just come and ask and we would presentfor like thirty minutes and then do Qa and we get like seventy people wouldshow up and we would just answer question. So I started to realize what waswhat did people want to know? Right, like what, you know, how long should my podcast be? Right, like there's a standard setof questions everybody wants to know. And then I started a lead magnet.Actually, is where the origin of mine was. It. I created alead magnet and then it started to get bigger and then I put it inCanava because it was easier to move around, and then it became like twenty sixpages and I was like this isn't a lead magnet, this is acurriculum. Yeah, and so I started teaching the curriculum, you know,to people real time and over, you know, the course of a year, I probably taught it twenty times, and then I have all done todoing corporate training, you know. So, like I recently sat with the AtlanticCouncil with like forty people in our organization on a zoom and I gotran through my entire curriculum, but like adjusted it for that brand, toyou know, so that it made sense. And after doing that, I waslike, wait a minute, I could make this a lot more accessibleto people in in this into a course. So for me it was about havinginformation, knowledge and skills that I could share with people that were valuable, as opposed to just like, let me try to find something like right, right, instead of just yeah. So the idea here is that youhave specific knowledge that people typically ask you about all the time. Why notturn that into something that you know can make you money? So I noticedon your website you talk a lot about intention. Can you talk more aboutcreating a course with an actual intention and what that means to you? Imean reverse engineers, my favorite term right. Like I read a ton of bookslast year and looked at all these people who were wildly successful and likereverse engineering is the number one like tool in their toolbox. Right. Wheredo you want to end up? What do you want your life to actuallylook like? What are you doing every day? Where are you waking up? What are you eating for breakfast? What does it look like outside?How many hours are you working? Like, really getting intentional with what you wantyour life to look like. And so even me, like I havea podcast called a lower third, which I I'm phasing out because it actuallyit. I didn't reverse engineering, I just wanted to talk to the interestingpeople I knew. But that has nothing to do with my business. It'snot really serving me other than it makes me feel good because I get tohang out cool people for an hour. Right, but but is it doinganything? Not so much. Right. So now I'm watching a new podcastcalled the podcast club, where I'm like, we're talking about podcasting, because that'swhat I really enjoy and Nerd oubt on. So I think just understanding, like what results you're going to yield from your efforts and making sure thatthat's something that you actually want and not just something that you think you want. And so I think you know it's...

...like there's a there's a balance,right, of starting ugly, like Chris Kay says, but also like havinga plan, right, like there's a middle ground there. Sure. Soyou recommend saying, like where do I want to be and what are thesteps that I need to do to get there? As an IT turns areyou? Are you like going to have a journal, or do you sitdown in journal every day, or do you have any things that that helpyou create intention? I meditate. I meditate every day and I'm really bigon like dry race boards and mapping things out and visualization. Like you can'tsee what my treadmill is next to me and in front of my treadmill isa white board and a I bought a wall calendar for Costa Rica and Iripped all the pages off and I put them up in front of me.The moving COASTA RICA in January. So every time I will not treadmill right. I think about what I want to look like. I'm a bathing suitwhen I get down Coasta Rica. I'm not a little faster, you know. So yeah, I mean I think you know dialing in, because sometimesyou can work on something for a really long time and put your whole heartand soul into it and then realize, like shit, I don't like this, yeah, this is not what I want to do. It like forme, I love teaching people, I love empowering people. I love itwhen they're taking notes in those Aha moments are going on and I'm like yeah, man, go out there and like and and take this and do whateveryou want with it. That's me so much more appealing than like having ayoutube channel personally where people like follow my journey, even though people tell meall the time I should do that, but I'm like it's not. Yeah, it doesn't. It's so bring me joy. Yeah, I want tojump back to something. I heard two things in there that I wanted tojump back to. First, you mentioned that you spent a year reading booksand with there any outliers in the books you read this last year that youcould recommend that somebody definitely needs on their bookshelf? First and foremost, notto be Cliche, but the for our work week and then the follow uptools of titans. That definitely changed my life. The fight the one pagemarketing plan by Alan Dibb is another really good is one of my favorite books. I've read that like three times. It's just, you know, it'sjust like Oh, yeah, it's so simple, but like it's such agood book. Man, you really put me on the spot here. Iread every single Burnet Brown book, so I focused. I decided that.You know, the average person has seventy thousand thoughts a day and like fiftypercent of them are negative and like more than half of them are thoughts you'vealready had and I was like, well, scratch that, I'm putting some newstuff in because I don't want to play this like game again, youknow. And so I set out to read a book a week, butthey were all, you know, business, personal, you know, development andfinance and marketing, like no romance novels or like true crime stuff,just like, you know, getting to the point, kind of learning alittle bit more about myself. And so I didn't hit the goal, butI read twenty eight books and because of that, I mean, my businessimproved a hundred and fifty percent. My personal life has improved, and so, yeah, let me think. You know, Bernand Brown's a great one. I don't know if you're shilier. Oh, absolutely huge brand brown fan. Yeah, I'm like the story I'm telling myself. You know, Iuse that often because I realized right,...

...okay, so those are really goodrecommendations. Actually have the one plan marketing book sitting right here, and I'ma huge fan of Ellen Dibb and, of course, Tim Ferris, whoisn't? You mentioned moving to Costa Rica. So tell me more about like that. Seems like a pretty big life decision. What is the impetus ofyou getting out of the United States. Well, you know, for meit's not so much about like getting out of some place, but getting intosome place. I'd rather be right. So it's not like I hate Americaor whatever. This has been a game. It was a five year plan thatthe pandemic turned into an eighteen month plan and then the last election admittedly, turned it into like a three month plan. But you know, Ilove this country, you know, couldn't do anything without it. But Imean, that's my jam. So when I was born, I was diagnosedwith the rare conditional birth, the fact I wasn't supposed to live. Twentyyears I've had a bunch of spinal surgeries. Like I faced my maker enough toknow that like Yo, you know, I've laid in that hospital bed enoughtimes going like Yo, if you if you don't make it out tomorrowmorning, like you good, you know, like a yeah, good, andthat's an internal question. And so for me, I've never been afraidof like take risks and make changes, and so I closed a company thatI ran for twenty years, asked in two thousand and eighteen, and that'swhen I formed heartcast media and I let go of all that and I wastotally fine to let go of that. A lot of people were shocked,but I wasn't. And then, when the pandemic hit, I closed downmy physical brick and mortar studio and I saw it as an opportunity to getout of all these leases, you know, and so I got out of myhouse and I got out of my studio and I gave everything away.That's awesome and it was great. I don't the only thing that I've missedis my handheld black and decker vacuum, like, you know, like ofall, like, of all the things I gave away, that was theonly thing. I'm like should I should have kept that useful tool. But, you know, again, it's visualization, like where do you where do youwant to end up? Write? Like I want to be in CostaRica, working on my courses, doing masterminds, like training people how toelevate amplify their voice, like that's what I've been doing for twenty years.That's what I want to continue to do and I want to travel the worldand get paid to speak about the democratization of information. Right, yeah,and that's what I mean. That sounds amazing and it really is proof thatyou live by the intent, that you know the intentions. So I absolutelylove that. So I wanted to share something with you. I created acourse that nobody asked me to make at one point, which is actually howI came up with the business pod decks, which is a whole other story.But what I wanted to talk to you about is what is your adviceto people who want to create a course but they don't necessarily have people linedup to buy it? Do you have any strategies that you could share withpeople to, you know, get pre orders or to feel out their audienceto see does anybody want this course before I spend hours and hours potentially buildingit? I mean market research is good. I guess you can see if it'slike oversaturated, but I think if nobody's already doing it, that meansit's a real window for you, and...

I think you know sometimes you're thegroup that you could reach out for feelers. Who is is not the people thatare going to buy your content anyway. Right. So I think I thinkone of the one of the like unintended consequences of creating a course orteaching a class or whatever version. It is right. It makes you continuallysharpen your sword. Right, I'm not. I'm going to make sure that whateverI'm telling you about Youtube, you know, that was in my courselast month, is updated, because things have changed, you know, sure, chapters and you know right. And so it makes you constantly update.And so there is an audience for you. And here's the thing. You don'tneed a thousand subscribers on Youtube, right, you don't need a thousandpeople to buy your course. Start with ten, you know, start witha hundred and then build from there, you know. And then, asfar as getting New People in, the fray, like, it's this wholehustle, right, and I figured it out. I took a bunch ofwebinars this summer and I watch how other people do it and not. Myfacebook feed is filled with those ads. Kill me now. But you know, it's all about run a free Webinar that talks, you know, fiveways to started a podcast without doing any work. Right, and then youdo a Webinar, you get people in, you get them in, you tellthem all the benefits of a podcast and any the ethical emergency, right, you know, like this won't be here tomorrow. What you do yourown version of that, because I don't subscribe to all of that, right, but you do these webinars, you get people in and then from there, then you pull them in and you sell them the course and that's howthey do it. But you got to spend a little bit of money onfacebook or Youtube ads or wherever you want to put your you know your powerand that's how you pull people into the Free Webinarre and then, ideally,from the Free Webinar, you convert. Right. Okay, so it's notnecessarily about your current audience at all. It could be new people based onhow you're targeting your ads to to get that visibility exactly. And if you'reunfamiliar with facebook adds, you can literally target by every single demographic you couldimagine, age location, if they're an engaged shopper, if they recently gotmarried. So if you think about starting a course for people who are goingto be in a wedding, let's just say you're a wedding podcast, youcan actually target people who are engaged, right, so you can, youcan share things like that with them. It's very as a very good tool. Okay, one of the things I noticed on your website is that youwant to help people create a course that makes sense. Now, obviously wewant our course to make sense if we're creating one. Are there any tipsyou have around how somebody can create a course that gives people enough information inthe right order? Do you have a formula for how you outline? Ofcourse it's kind of like the beginning, the WHO, the where, thewhat, the why, you know, and then the implementation. Right,there's kind of an overall structure for it. But I think really a lot ofI mean it. I again this...

...is from personal experience, but Iwould really recommend like doing a couple versions of your course live on like ayou know, like a Webinar kind of thing, right. Webin are likeI have my I do it all the time. I do like podcast.You know everything you need to know and it's like a threehour thing, man, you know what I mean? It's long, right. Comes with acustom Trello board and like all kinds of resources. I mean, this thingis a beast. But in that process I have gotten so much better atit and I have reorganized that board and I have like optimize my systems,but it will. It took me doing it right you know, it's likeyou can map out your presentation, then you get in front of the audienceyou're like, Oh shit, no one's yeah, right, like you,yeah, Herey, boot right, you know. So, like you know, know, and then also knowing what questions people are going to ask themost, because I might think these are the five most valuable pieces of information, but like, they don't give a shit about that. They just reallywant the other five things that I thought everybody knew, right. So,and the only way that you can figure that out is just doing it.Yeah, I love that. So by going live, you're able to createsomething where people can interact with you live and you actually give you feedback thatyou can make the course better. And I love that. You said youknow, the five things that you thought everybody knew. They didn't know,and that was something that was definitely more important for your pillar content than whatyou thought people knew, because it's easy as an expert to think like Oh, that's just over something. Everything everyone knows and there's a lot of peopleout there struggling with it. You mentioned trouble trolls, when my absolute favoritetools in the world. I wanted to ask you what are some of yourfavorite tools or platforms for creating a course or launching a course? You haveany deal that you I presume you have a great list. You know,I'm really partial to Trello. I build everything out on Trelo. So Icreate like a template for my clients and then I have them kind of fillit in and then I help them move it around. They always get superoverwhelmed the first or like what is this thing, and then they grow tolove it, just like everybody with Trello or you're like now and now I'mlike, I can't live without it. So because it you know, youcan move things around, you, you know what I mean. And thenand then I brand it all for them and they start to see the thingcome to life, and I think that's more important to like get that visualon it right then, like a spreadsheet or a bunch of Google Docs,like no man, you can see this thing and that helps them like conceptualizethe next step. You know, I think I feel like we're probably similarin a lot of ways. Like I'm really good at synthesizing information into likea way that's digestible, but like I've learned that that is not everyone's forday and it's a real like struggles sometimes, right, so by displaying it forthem, I found that to be really, really helpful. And thenI think learned. Honestly, I think hosting your website on your wordpress orthrough your crm is the way to go. And, like, I get it. I know teachable and Kad Jobi are awesome, but they're super expensiveand thirty bucks or fifty buck or ninety nine dollars doesn't seem like a lot. But what about five years from now, like, are you really prepared tospend four thousand dollars to like put your course someplace? Because that seemslike some highway robbery to me, you...

...know, and that's how I wantto I want to think about the long term. I want to think aboutbringing in course clients and masterminds for the next ten years, right, likewhile I'm drinking Tequila at in coast La Rica, right like I want tobe like running courses, and so I want to think about the long term. So and now a lot of these crm tools have these membership portals,which is just online courses, right, and I think at the end ofthe day, if you're marketing is good and you're getting the visibility and you'rebringing people and they don't really care what the platform is as long as theycan click through it and they can see the pictures in the videos. Theend user is agnostic in their preference to the platform. So it really boilsdown to how much do you want to pay? How Tech Savvy Are you? Are you familiar with word learned, which is like a wordpress, likeplug in, but that has like a wo commerce back end and everything else? But it's a little cumbersome, but everything is there. And then again, the sea rms have some pretty simple membership ones that are great because afterdoing webinars and your funneling people in, then you can put them into anurture campaign, you know what I mean. You can let your crm kind ofdo some of that heavy lifting and then you just yeah, and onceyou've got them, they don't really care what the platform is, you knowwhat I mean, and they should. It's the information they care about,not the specific delivery. Right now, with the pandemic and everything, doyou have you seen an uptick in people foraging for information or trying to learnand get better while they're trapped at home? You have you seen an uptick incourses? Um, for sure, courses are doing really well right now. I think. I think we're going through phases right, like the pandemicis like a life cycle, right, like well, first we had likedenial, you know, I've then we were like I'm gonna learn a bigbread and like I'm going to take all these classes and that. Then therewas like the like I'm just going to like sit on my coup to Drinkinat two o'clock. I don't. I feel like it's a whole journey thatwe're on. So I feel you know, but people, and I think peopleare getting zoom burnout from all the bad audio, from people who refusebuy microphones. Yes, you know, come on, y'all s eight months. But because you know, we don't have zoom burnout, we have badaudio burnout right, like in you and I understand that we're both using likeshore Mike's Right, I got the same mic over there. I'm just usingthis one because I think it's cool. But like it's not the zoom,it's the bad audio. And Yeah, and so the idea of like takingsomething online, I think to some people's like you know, but for otherpeople that are home and the only it's a great thing to distract them.So I mean, I think it really just depends on your content and whoyou're trying to reach and what who your audience is really kind of defines youknow who's going to pay attention to it. So when I made my first course, like I said, I made a huge mistake. I spent sixweeks building out this discourse that no one had really asked me to make,and so I've always been a big proponent of at least ask people, isthis something that you'd like to see or get some type of information? What? What? What? Other what are the mistakes do you see people creatingcourses make on a regular basis? Well,...

...my favorite quotes. Don't that perfectbe the enemy of good, right? And some people just like want everythingto be so dialed in and I'm like, Dude, you're going toRedo this course couple times, you're going to want to change things out nextmonth and like that's okay, and then they get even more of them,like what do you mean? We got to do this again? I'm like, I'm just saying, man like, throw the Spaghetti on the wall.You can rewrite that paragraph later. Like dude, your four weeks behind schedule, like, let's go. You know what I mean, just just justdo it and I get it right. Like and I hate talking about impostersyndrome because I get every women's event, that's all they want to talk about, and I'm like, show me where the money is. Man Like,I don't really want to talk about my feelings. It's not what I camehere for. But but like when teach, when doing a course, that reallycomes into Blake. Is Not only you claiming to be an expert whereyou're charging to teach other people. So any of those insecurities are going tocome of flooding back and really, but what do you know? And sosome of that you got to find your way out of that. You know? Yep, okay, so get you. So forget imposter syndrome and and perfection. I agree with you. I think some beats none really right.You know, like do something, put something out there, and it soundslike you are constantly looking at your content and updating it and making sure thatit's the most current. So you'll build a course and then you monitor itand you keep updating it and that gives you another opportunity to pitch it toyour existing customers, right, because there's new content for them to come backto, and then you more marketing to put out for the new clients thatyou may receive. Okay, so podcasters looking to monetize, what did someonedo who may not have a specific niche? Now, I don't know if it'sniche or nish or whatever the word is, but let's say you're apodcaster and you're trying to monetize through a course. How can you sort ofreverse engineer what would be like just a quick, I guess, thought processon like, what could my course be? You have any advice for that?Totally. So, like, I can give an example of me right, like we're launching the podcast club, a podcast about podcasting. Well,if I wanted to do a course that was like the twelve days of podcasting, like the twelve most important things that you need to know, I wouldactually like isolate what that is like introduction, equipment, tech, you know whatediting whatever, right, like sure, well, now I could, youknow, loosely base my podcast episodes on those topics. Right. Sowhat episode me and my buddies could talk about rss host and WHO's the best? Now from that I can refine, because I think repurpose is like soundslike you're pulling out of the cycling been right, but you can refine thatcontent because now you can take audio samples from that podcast, you can transcribethat podcast, and now you've got a lot of filler for like that coursecontent. Right. So a lot of times people use podcasts to support otherproducts, but I think using a podcast...

...to create other products is the wayto go, right, like you start with podcast, you transcribe it.Now you've got an outline. Right. So that's where the intentional thing comeslike, if you know you want to write a book, why not doa podcast and do twelve episodes, like twelve chapters in the book, andat least give yourself a wire frame of content for you to go with?Copy and paste, right, get that kind of sort out, and thenyou go in and you do your high level editing, and now you've evengot video samples. You've got you could even say, Oh, we're talkingabout ourss beeds in the course, like here's what my buddy Marcus de Paulahad to say about it. Right, like I could eve it, youknow. And now it becomes this like you know, sonic landscape. Ilove throwing that in any any chance I can. But you know, itbecomes this real products and it's not as much of a heavy lift. Insteadof doing twelve episodes of podcast and being like Shit, now I got towork on my course like no man. That's where the intention comes in andthe reverse engineering or even creating your content in reverse. I love that.I absolutely love that. And I did notice that you are a big proponentof the audio book. So I've imagined that that plays into your strategy foran audio book. You're recording a podcast. Let's chop that up, or atleast created outline for our audiobook. Right, exactly, like why Ido it twice. Right, smart or not? Harder, like maximize yourimpact with what you already have. Right, use what you have. Another oneof my favorite mantras like use what you have. So what really inspiredthat for me was Malcolm Gladwell's book talking to strangers. It's amazing. Imean it's a great book, but like he takes all these interviews and podcastsand samples that he's done, and so he opens and closes the book withSandra Bland. But he liked plays her audio from the facebook videos and likeI'm getting goosebumps right now, like it's one thing to tell Sandra Bland story, it's nothing to hear her voice. Right. And he talks about CIAagents and he plays interviews from those CI agents and some of the recordings aren'teven good, right, but that's a kind of makes it better because it'sdifferent than the rest of it. And now it's just like realiantly produced multimedia, you know, audio book. So and he any opens by sayingthis is a hybrid between a podcast and an audiobook, and and the lightsjust went on for me. I was like, this is how you getit done on right. Yeah, but you have to have the wherewith allthe know that, like at some point you want to have a course,you want to have a book, you want to have an audiobook, andin order to do that you have to like meditate, man, you right, you have to. You have to remove, you know, eat abunch of mushrooms or meditate. I don't know which. Everyone you know.You know whichever one you want to get down with or both. I mean, Hey, why not do book? But, like you know, yougot to kind of get outside yourself and take that third party perspective on yourown life and then and then map it out, pretend you're not yourself,preten years something your buddy who you're giving advice to, because it's always easierto see other people's stuff and it is your own. Yeah, absolutely,it's hard to it's hard to look inward in that way. Absolutely, ifyou could look through anybody's email without them knowing who's email would you look through? Oh my God, I want to...

...say rag Dallioh, but I probablywouldn't even understand half of it. Will understand like ninety percent of it,let's be honest. That's a really good question. All Right, I'll letyou. I'll let you simmer on that one. Yeah, okay, whatis this? A pod deck question? Is it is a podcast? Ilove it. It's a good one. Yeah, what if you could sitnext to anybody on a ten hour flight, who would it be? And why? Tim Ferris, Tim Ferris, okay, big Tim Ferris Fan,although he probably wouldn't talk to me, probably have like air buzz in andbe like working the whole time, but I think you talked to you.You got a good vibe. Thanks you. I appreciate that you'd figure out away to you figure out a way to open that can. Right.I'm like, buy him some drinks, something, do whatever it took,but I mean that guy is just it's not even so much that I'm afan of Tim Ferris, right, I don't know a ton of about himper se, but the dude is super smart and he's interviewed this smartest peopleon the planet for like the last five years, and so he is agold mine of information. Yeah, that he is so happy to share andsynthesize right, like he's one of those people I can synthesize like specially toolsof titans, how he takes like the most important parts of these interviews.I mean, yeah, phenomenal, brilliant, brilliant, nominal. Yeah, he'dbe, he'd be. I wouldn't want to read his emails, though, because it's probably ridiculous. Well, he only checks his emails a coupletimes a day. So right, right, for our work week, I'm well, yeah, or or not at all, right, which is all. Yeah, we're not at all that that's the best. That's the bestcase scenario, but we're stuck with email. So all right. So I dohave to mention that at heartcast media, one of the things that you dois you actually will create courses for people. So if you're listening rightnow and you're thinking like I would like to start a course or I wouldlike to create a course, but I don't have I don't know what todo, I don't know where to start. I need somebody to rain it in, this is the perfect opportunity. So you can go to heartcast MEDIACOMand schedule a call with you and talk to you about what that would looklike. To work together and build a course that can start making you money. Absolutely awesome. So I definitely want people to take take you up onthat, because I think that one thing that people don't think about is witha digital product, you basically, and let's just say this for an example, you're going to do the work wants and you're going to be able tosell this constantly. Now we did talk about refining, which I really love, and you're going to have to refine that course at some point when itbecomes outdated. But you're doing something once that's going to continually make you money, essentially without overhead. Right, depending on whether you decide to go witha Kajabi or the learned or whatever platform you go on. So you're creatingthis product that's going to continually make money without having to print products or manufactureor things like that, which is one of probably the fastest ways that acontent creator or podcaster could probably monetize their...

...podcast, without taking pennies on thedollar to send someone to guy go right or to a period blue apron orwhatever these are, or to have ads randomly stuck into your podcast when it'sjust completely unnecessary. So I invite everybody to go to hardcast media and ifyou're serious about making a course, you can make serious money and you've helped. How many people have you built courses for? Shoe? Like thirty,I think at this point. Okay, so she knows what she's doing,obviously right. Um, and then you mentioned the Pod Club, so I'mreally interested in this. When is POD club launching? Well, we definitelygot to have you on as a guest for sure, because I love everythingthat you do. I think POD DEX is brilliant. I think it's sucha smart thing and after, you know, listening to more of your podcast andgetting to know you, I mean I think you're a genius, honestly, and what a smart thing to know. For Real, I mean what asmart thing to create. Like you've edited so many I mean you've heardthe worst interviews and you've heard the best interviews and now you've condensed it intothis like handy deck, and I'm definitely going to get a set of thosecards myself because I could always be a better interviewer as well. But thepodcast club is with me and Adam Levin and Marcus de Paulo. So AdamLevin is the grandson of Chuck Levin's Music Center, which is like a sixtyyear old music store here in the area. Yeah, cast outfitters, podcast outfittersexactly, and Marcus the Paula is from me, only louder. He'slike a hardcore music industry of Etan and audio engineer, really like, youknow, if you're looking to do an audio drama or some really high,high level podcasting, like he is your man and he's an expert in softwareand you know editing and all of those things, and Adam is your gearand equipment guy, and then I am your like feasibility aspect. So wetalked everything about what's happening in the podcast world, what new equipments coming outhow things work. We get a little technical but you know, mostly we, you know, crack jokes and hang out and dirt out about podcasting.Cool. So is it coming soon or when could people expect it? Yes, actually, the pilot should be going up on itunes this week and thenwe will start rolling out episodes. We did a couple, you know,bad first start episodes just to get the ball rolling. So we'll drop thosenetflix style and then we'll be live every Saturday morning on Linkedin, facebook,Youtube, periscope, twitch, you know, every possible place that we can golive we do. I do that through restream. So if anybody's interestedin video streaming, that's a great option for you and it's also a greatopportunity for us to showcase our skills, because we record everything and then wecreate the custom video templates and backdrops and everything else, so it doesn't looklike zoom or anything else people are seeing on the Internet. It's really customized, and so it will be exciting to be able to show everybody some ofthe skills that we've developed in some of...

...the services were offering. That's awesome. I can't wait to hear because I know all three of you know,or I know of all three of you know. So I think that that'slike the three Amigos of podcasting going on right there. I mean, yeah, there's such good there's such good guys, like they're super knowledgeable, they're incrediblyintelligent and they're like literally the nicest people I know. Like I amdefinitely like the derelict in the group. I mean I'm nice, but I'malways joking about eating mushrooms and so whatever. But, you know, they're justsuch good guys and and you know, I don't want to talk any smackabout the podcast industry, but it's like full of white dudes from theirbasements who like, quite frankly, treat women horrendously and like Mansplain to UStalk down to us. And I mean I'm in a group of, youknow, women editors just busters, which is an amazing facebook group. There'sa thousand women in that group. Wow, thousand women. Yeah, I knowa couple just busters, Carrie and emily pro cop exactly, and carrieslike, you know, the Queen, you know, be of the wholething. And I mean, but that's that speaks volumes, as there's athousand women in podcast editing that most people don't know about because we're not comingin your groups because y'all don't know how to handle yourselves like normal adults.It it's mindboggling. I mean I've had people accuse me of being a liar, saying I was only in it for the money, because I said thatyoutube was a great platform. I mean, it's like, I don't even wantto go into it, but it's okay. Well, behalf of thebehalf of all the white too is I'm not in a basement, but I'mdefinitely down with the just busters and women are powerful in podcasting, so youbetter watch out. Very cool. Well, again, I love your vibe.I can't wait to hear the Pod Club podcast and if you're looking tohave somebody assist you with creating an amazing course, definitely head over to heartcastmedia schedule. Call. You just heard this and you could tell how muchfun you would have creating a course with molly. So thank you so much. Is there anything you like to share before we go with my community ofpodcasters? Now, just thanks for having me on, thanks for listening andkeep supporting, Travis. I mean, I'm sure you have a really activefan base, because you're your solid person, you have a great product, andso you know, for anybody listening, make sure you buy Travis this coursewhen it comes out. Are you can relaunch this course? What I'mso you can you send me this course, like I I will send is calledShortcutt podcasting. I still sell the course, and then I also havea course called interview secrets, where it's how to you run a successful interviewpodcast, which was done obviously after I've launched my very first course. Butwhen I launched my first course I came up with the idea for sending peoplethe deck of cards that had interview questions to help them get interviewed. Andwhen I launched the course, everybody said, I don't care about the course,what are the cards? Sounds like. Okay, maybe people want these cardsinstead. So I named it pod...

...decks, and here we are ayear later, with thousands of podcasters using them. We also have a thepod decks APP. So so I am I am going to send you somepod decks of your very own before you move to Costa Rica, so Ican save on that shipping. Okay, yeah, that's amazing. Thank youso much for having me on tracks. Hey, you rock, molly,and I can't wait to talk to you very soon.

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