Podcast Builder Club
Podcast Builder Club

Episode 29 · 10 months ago

Painless Podcast Guest Matching feat. Alex Sanfilippo of Pod Match

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of the tricky parts of podcasting is finding the right guest to bring onto your show. Booking Agents have been a great way to do this, but they’re often too expensive for most podcasters to afford. Today’s guest, podcaster Alex Sanfilippo, saw this problem happening for many podcasters and came up with a solution to help connect people more easily. His service Podmatch uses AI to match you with your best interview guests!

In this episode, Alex and Travis talk about:

  • How Podmatch works for you to give you painless interview matching and additionally helps to build community amongst podcasters through resources and events.
  • How to step away from a competitive mindset and embrace the power of connection, especially through networking.
  • Awesome book recommendations (see resource links below!).
  • The best ways to pitch potential guests and mistakes people often make when trying to get a guest.
  • Podcast interview etiquette, such as setting expectations and how to make your guests comfortable on your show.

Memorable Quotes

“Podmatch is an AI-driven program. It’s going to match you to your most ideal guest or most ideal host. It takes all of the guesswork out of it.”

“Alone we can do so little, but together we can do so much” -Helen Keller

Links to Resources

Podmatch
 

Alex’s website: Creating a Brand

Alex’s Podcast: Creating a Brand

Connect with Alex: www.alexsanfilippo.com

Book Recommendations:

-Kai-Fu Lee’s AI Superpowers
 

-Kevin Kelly’s 1000 True Fans

Nir Eyal’s Indistractable 


Once you’ve booked the guest of your dreams, download the PodDecks mobile app (Apple and Android) for great interview questions.

Wouldn't it be amazing if we could useartificial intelligence to get matched with the perfect guest for interview,podcast, Hey Syri, can you find me a guest for my podcast? Sorry, I can'tsearch your podcast. Well. I've got good news for you. Today's episode ofpodcast therapy is all about pod match now. PODMATCH is a service that usesartificial intelligence to automatically match you with the bestguests. You can create high quality interviews for your podcast, so I'vegot the founder Alexanfilippo. He is a rock star podcaster. He runs creating abrandcom pod match and he has a very successful interview. PODCAST now, inthis episode, he's Goingto share with you how he got Seth Goden on hispodcast he's going to share with you some amazing podcast interview,etiquette tips and, of course, how to pitch yourself and get better guestsoverall. So, if you're looking to get more guest high quality guests for yourinterview, podcast, you don't want to miss this episode. So I recently read this book called AiSuperpowers. I'm not sure, if you're familiar with that book, but it's adeep dive into the race between China and the United States and AI. What gotyou particularly interested in AI, using AI, with your new tool pot matchwell, that book makes it sound a lot more intense than I was ever thinking.First of I have not heard of that book, but for us it was the realization thatwe needed to offer something to this market that has only been offered on ahand to hand basis human to human basis and that's the booking agents the worldwhich are fantastic, but you and I know, and so does even the bookingagents.It's not four. Ninety five percent of people most people can't afford it. Itdoesn't make sense for r their business or anything like that. So when we hadthe idea for pod match, we knew that we wanted to somehow help people findtheir ideal guest or the ideal host to have them. But there was no way wecould give a hands on experience and...

...not have a crazy cost to go with that.So we decided weave, develop something. That's going to get smarter as timegoes on right. That's the idea of AI. CAN IT GET SMARTER? Can it have amatching core that puts people together to the right fit for each other andthat was really AU whole basis behind it? It was something I knew nothingabout going into it, thankfully, of a business partner. That's I like tothink he's a little it smarter than I am so he kind of had some of thisalready figured out and he done work like this before and the idea was. CanWe build something that is very similar to these online dating APPs thateveryone uses they have an algorithm as well? They have something that works toput people together. Can we use that same type of tech as long as it's notproprietary information right, anything that this public knowledge and how tomake that work? And that's exactly what we did with this OIT's? So wonderful and you know Ai. Ihighly recommend you get this book because it basically shares how these companies and what they're doingand how you know the wee chat, APP revolutionized China an the way theyspend money and the way they gather data. Are there any other trends yousee in podcasting, where AI might jump in and help us like podmatch hasyeah, you know a lot of it. The thing I like about podcasting is it's oneperson talking to an audience right, so I don't know where all the applicationsare going to be. For this sort of thing. I do see that there's a lot ofopportunity to optimize a lot more of what's happening, but as far as havingAI involvement, I'm really not sure the only place. I've really seen that Iwill say that would be very interesting to see somebody working which is notthe space I'm in, but actually having something that will give an algorithmout there. That's helping a listener, find the ideal podcast wet having tosearch for anything. Could I just say: here's who I am, can it go ahead andlike scrape my linked in somehow and say, here's ten recommendations for you?I might have just given someone a million dollar idea right there yeah, Ithinkd. I think I'm like scribbling down some notes over here: Yeah, that'sa big cony yeah, so so putting intelligence behind curation orlisteners. That sounds like an amazing...

...future. So what I really love about youis that you didn't just start a podcast matching tool for podcasters to get Bhave. It N easier way to getinterviews but you're, actually a podcaster yourself and the creating abrand podcast. You've interviewed some amazing people like Seth Goden, Johnly,doomis, J bear the list goes on and on so when you were which came first. WasIt podcasting first for you, and then you realized that there was anopportunity for you to build this tool for people, or did you always have itin the back of your head that you were going to make something for podcasters.You know I started humbly from a place of I wanted to do. A podcast is how itstarted, and so I just kind of listened around to see if I could find podcast.I like that. I wanted to sound like, and I just wasn't finding exactly whatI was looking for. So I decided to do creating a brand and really just madeit to serve a handful of people that knew would like it, and it's always myfocus people like how many downloads you have- and I probably don't look asmuch as I should, but really I know that the few people that it really ismade for it's reaching, because I hear from those people on a regular basis,and that means everything to me so for me, as I got into podcasting it's kind of scary, to get into rightlike day one you're like okay, I need like a hundred different things andwhat the heck is apple and how do I get something on there right, like thoseare the things that we all think about and are challenged with, and I want tosay about this indutry as a whole. Some of the nicest people iave ever met inmy life and most helpful people Ho eer met. My life are in the podcastingspace and I feld in love with how people are, and I come from abackground of the aerospace industry which is cut throat. I mean, if youwork with somebody, they don't want you to get too close, because they're likeI could get that next promotion, when this company grows to do anotherbillion dollars or if they're outside that company, like I'll, kill you, if,if you call one of my customers right like for like o better term, so I cameinto this pace. I'm like Oh, my gosh. These people are amazing, and so I justkind of develop this attitude of. I want to help serve these people,because some mony of them have helped me freely and my podcast his donereally well, and I sayd that very humbly, and I say it because otherpeople have helped me along the way and me, including this podcast. My podcasttherapy is awesome and quick shout out to you. You just recently did anepisode where you shared five points...

...about reviewing your podcast processand I'm guessing you do that every single year that really spoke to methat's going to help me make my podcast even better in the new year. So thankyou for that and that's my perfect example of like of what it's done forme. So when I just realize some any people were serving here. I wanted tosee if I could find a need, so I actually went to podfast multimediaexpo at the beginning of to thousand and twenty. It was like the lastconference ever to be in Perlin there too. Oh, were you really yeah? Therewas the right before like right. When the pandemic hit, it was like you couldget a sticker on your badg and said, like I'm, not comfortable shaking hands,I hug Al Those Muc O. I feel terrible now, like Therre, where I'm like getover here. You're geting a hug anyway, and but while while I was there and youwere there, I was actually asking people hey. What do you struglieg withthem podcasting just to see if there was a need or if I could just at leasthelp network and put people together that needed each other? And I found inthat room? There's nout two thousand people thereas, you might remember, andonce Sidt Hof Room, there was author showing up, they didn't have podcast,but they wanted to talk about their new book and the other side. There waspodcast host that were. Some of them are a little bit newer, a little bitmore experienced but we're having a really hard time, narrowing down theirideal audience and that's kind of when it click for me that okay, there's gotto be whad to conect these people together and I was like. Oh, I got itbooking agents, let's just put thim in touch with those people, so I starteddoing that and e like. I don't have fifteen grand to Spendin year, tengrand O spending year, whatever it costs, I'm like okay, that that makes alot of sense so and from there. It just went to these white boards are behindme where I'm talking right now like these white boards, rememer was holdinga kettle bell that the night that I got the idea and I ran inside justwhiteboard the whole idea out and immediately called an old businesspartner of mine. That hadn't worked within a couple F years and told themhey man. We got to go for this and he totally agreed and the rest is kind ofhistory and that's how we started this thing. So Pot match came to be fromfrom really just siing and need and wanting to meet it and to serve anindustry that I care so much about awesome. So if you're listening rightnow, you might be saying I don't even know what pod match is. So I want togive you the opportunity to give the the pitch I haven't written down here,but I think it comes much better from the Creator himself. What exactly ispot match? Yeah, I'm like super curious...

...to hear what Syou wrote down, but I'm'Mi'll, give mine real, quick, so pot match is an AI driven program. That,basically, is going to match you to your most ideal, guest or most idealhost. It takes all of the guest work out of it. There's no more searchingthrough directories or asking a lot of people. Questions from here you canfind the place the people we've match you with, and you can either pass onthose or decide to match with them. You can message an right there. You can doall the scheduling, a toz without ever having to exchange an email just withinside the podmatch ecosystem yeah. I had written down painlessinterview matching I like that. Just ass sort of my three, my three wordsand you know before we got on the call here we were sort of we were sort ofcomparing it to you, know online dating where you have a service that isactually sort of working for you to make a match. Foryou and one of my biggest complaints with some of the other platforms. IsYou know you really have to spend a lot of time digging through them in orderto find the right match, and when I set up my pod match account. I immediatelygot matched with people that were relevant and that I wanted to have onmy podcast without really having to do anything, but you know trying toimprove my profile. So you know it's an amazing tool. It's a free tool andwe'll put a link that you can. You can click in the an the notes and just gocheck it out d. make yourself an account and start automatically gettingmatchd with. I think relevant is the most important thing you can create anaccount on other places and get all kinds of different people that aren'treally. You know part of the core message orthe core audience you're trying to hit. So I just really love that and there'sone other thing. So I want to go back to you talked about podfest and whenyou go on the podmatch website, there's one word that sticks out to me. That isa theme throughout podcasting in the podcasting community. It's communityright and you're really focused on creating community around pod match,and I was wondering if you could share a little bit more. I know we talkedabout how podcasters are awesome and we're all collaborative yeah, and thisis a thing that comes up on the podcast. But what what made you decide thatyou're not just going to make a tool...

...for people but you're going to grow acommunity within that yeah. So for me again, all this came back from peoplejust being golling to help me and t all that started off is outraged andpodcasting is one dimensional. I mean Travisyu me, may not that guess:podcasters listen this, so this one might be a little bit different, but mypodcast and Aybe. If you have another one that you do as well, you don'tnecessarily hear from a lot of your listeners and it's very one dimensional.So it can be a bit of a lonely space for people. So for me I just know thepower of community in my life is always helped me to go further faster, soeverything I do. I try to incorporate community somehow some way, and Iunderstand that not everyone's looking for that. But if people are, wedefinitely wante to have that option. So yeah part of Pon matches there's acommunity we built on on mighty networks, which I think is a reallyclean platform for building community and we've got that there. We list, likeall the different events that are happening around the place. We listresources and stuff, like that. It's just really important us to makesure that we do that. There's a quote by Hellen Keller that I really I quoteall the time, but she said that alone. We can do so little, but together wecan do so much and I've always just held on to that, and I want to makesure I incorporate that anywhere that I ever am that's amazing and I think there'sthere's two like subset thought groups in. I think any industry and there'sthe ones that realize that there's enough for everyone and then they'rethe ones that stay proprietaryand don't want to share anything. And you know, if you help other people, youwill get the things in life that you want, and so by collaborating andrealizing that there's eight billion pairs of ears out there and that youreally actually don't need them all to be a successful podmaster yeah, youknow, do you know who Kevin Kelly is the one thousand true fans? Oh yes,yeah! Okay, so you know this is something that comes up. A lot is thatyou really only need about a thousand true fans to give you about a hundredbucks a year to make a living at podcasting or being an artist or beinga musician, and so to think that you need to capture all eight billion.People is crazy. So there's enough for everybody, there's enough peoplelistening for everyone and that's where...

...the community aspect comes in andcollaboration is a big part of interviews right. So when I reached outto you, if you were closed off and not a collaborator, you would have made anexcuse or rush me off, but you know it's all about collaboration andnetworking which you seem to be a master at networking. Can I get yourthought process because I think the way I connected with you as actuallythrough linked in and it seems like you- spend a lot of time foraging for and developing newrelationships yeah. I absolutely do, and you know it's funny if this waseight months ago. Actually I shouldn't say it's funny. This is kind of sadeight months ago. I would not have reached out to you unlinked in becauseI could have just kept on going to the networking events in my city andtraveled around to go to networking events, but I had to turn to somethingI'm like addicted to it. Now you know, like you, can just see the power of it. So for me, networking is, it all comes back down to being aconnector, and I find that there's nothing more joyful for me than helpingother people get connected, and I think that some people have this like you'retelling, like maybe more recompetitive, mind so that were like well, if Iintroduce travis to this person that person is going to get on the podcastinstead of me, like I shouldn't do that. The truth is when you look out forother people, man, something just happens- doors open for you and eversince I got this mindset years ago again I come from a very competiveindustry, so for a while I was kind of closed off to that. But now I try mybest to be as open as I possibly can and just introduce people and be thatconnector and I have found more doors open Han than you could imagine fromjust doing that. So my idea of networking is maybe somebody has a verysimple problem that I have a solution for and can I help them solve that notsaying my genius, but maybe I just know somebody like perfect example: I'veused pod deck a lot like I'm a customer of yours and when people are like newto especially new to doing interviews and they're like oh I'm having troublelike asking good questions, I have a resource like I can immediately send itto him and that Dosn't make me any smarter. I'm just like. I pointed themthat way, but later on, when one of their friends is like Ooh, I think Ineed like. I need a coach. It might be like. Oh this Guy Alex he's reallysmart and all I did was push them from Atz and I find that just be realyhelpful and it's not why I do it. I do it because I deeply care about people,there's something that ive say it's on...

...my white board behind me, one of them.I've got three because all references biboards a lot, but I say that Alexanply both seeks to be a person of value, not a person of profit, and Itruly mean that I'm here to be a person of value for other people, not just tomake money off of them, because that's just my deep rooted conviction is toserve others. I love that and I couldn't agree withyou more. That's the exact Creedo that I have in my business. Is You knowpeople before profit right, so it's a Commut, it's the comunity, it's notabout making money, it's about elevating others and helping them reachtheir goals. So that's amazing, and I really love that and you seem I don'tknow. I don't know you from the aerospace world, but I would be willingto bet your way more happy, and you seem illuminated now by thisopportunity of becoming a catalyst, and you know is that you feel like that'strue. Do you feel free of that competitive nature? Yeah, you know it'ssomething I had to. I had became partof who I was like. I started doing thepersonality testand over times. I replaced what used to be the learnerwith competitive, and that was just me being in the space I was in, which iskind of crazy. I think that my personality was changing because theindustry was in and there's nothing wrong with that industry. Some peopleabsolutely love it and they don't develop that mindset. I just couldn'tovercome it for some reason and it's interesting I'll show this real quick.We talked about this offline, but I just interviewed Dr Gay Hendrickyesterday and he has the book called the big leap and in it he talks aboutyour Zon of Excellenc ind yourzone of genius. What I found is for years. Iwas stuck in that zone of excellence. I was good at at what I was doing in theairospace industry. I work I wite Po Senior Director of a publicly tradedmultibillion dollar company like I was doing really well, but I was neverusing my zone of genius just excellence and when I actually shifted, I'mactually now full time podcasting between pod match and creating a brand.When I made that shift, I moved into my genius zone and I really begin foundingfinding places that were like that deeper rooted personality that I oncehad that have started coming back now them out of a super competitiveenvironment and that's probably longer answer you're looking for, but I thinkit was important to show. I love, I think, that's amazing, there'. That'smakes me very happy that you've been...

...able to transition like that and getinto the genius zone, because I think a lot of people'. You know spend too muchtime trying to make things perfect, especially podcasters D of makingprogress, and you know poddext was started on accident and if I hadn'ttaken a leap to do, one thing I wouldn't have stumbled upon the next,which led me here today, so you have to take chances and you have to take risks,and you have to find ways to let your true self be illuminated through that,and it's just it's just great to see. So speaking of networking, if you couldsit on a plane for a nine hour flight with anybody, and the idea here is thatyou're going to actually interact with that person who would that be yeahright now? I really think that Brendan Bruchard would be somebody I beinterested in. That's probably a really common response that you hear andthere's a lot of great leaders that are very similar to him a while ago.Actually, before I left the AIRO space industry, I picked up his book, thoughthe High Performance Habits is what it wascalled, and I read through that and actually really helped me understand,that the area that I was in a high performer was my courage and that'swhat I was lacking to make a change like courage is a big deal like youstarted poddects in this podcast, because you were courageous in the areaand decided to take the risk and that's the area was most lacking in, and maybeit was just the comfort of the corporate world or something like that.Don't know I don't know what it was, but it's what made me realize? I needto take that leap so Brendan Bresharould, be the person I'd love tojust see if I could learn even more from in this season, Af life than I'min awesome and you've rever reference,several books, I'm an avid reader. What one book do you think belongs onEverybody's book shelf as a believer have to say the Bible. I will pass onthat one because it's the automatic answer, so everyone just know. That'swhere I stand with that Um, I think in the world we live in today. Probablythe most important is this book titled Indestractable by Near Eal,indistractable, and the reason I think it's so important is because we live ina world that is just bombarded by distraction and whether that be this,the things everyone thinks of...

...immediately right social media TV. Itcan be other things, it can be busy work, it can be email there's, so manythings were distracted by and we have to learn to stop making time for thoseindustr like being distractable and we have to start being indistractable byactually focusing on traction, and that book really really spoke to me and I'vebeen saying that all year, that's Hoe, oe thing, Yo's, gont, every business,an and every home as well. That's awesome. I have not heard ofthat book and I cannot wait to devour it because right, you know, you know,as somebody who's trying to build a business or a podcast. It's very easyto say: I'm going to do the easy things that make me feel like I'm gettingmomentum, but righyou avoid eating drog, so to speak. We avoid doing the hardwork and those are the things that sort of freak you out are the things thatyou really need to do to break through to the next level. So that soundsabsolutely incredible. So I was on pod match the other day and you've createda bunch of mini courses or many tutorial videos, and so I wanted to seeif we could share some of the information that people may not havebeen on pod match with. So you know as an expert in sort ofconnecting people. What do you think is the best way to pitch a guest, becauseI think podcasters do different things. Ill, DM people or they'll send emails,and I have my own thoughts on this that I share another podcast. But what doyou think is the best way to pitch a potential guest yeah? So if you're andI've done this really wrong, I have to say this is a learned skill for sure.I'm probably close to ninety episodes in on what I'E had recorded. If you goback to episode one and look at the pitch I sent like, I want to rip it up,I mean it was on the Internet, but I want to punch my computer screen orsomething it was bad. So like this is a learned skill and I think you getbetter at it over time. Something like podmatch really helps out. I'm nottrying to push people to that necessarily, but because you actuallyhave a one sheet for your for yourself as a guest, and also the host of thepodcast has an overview of it. So it automatically allows you to messagesomebody and share much less information than a lot of people. Tryto do so. A few things I'll mention not to do don't, say hey I want to like. Iwant you to be my podcast like if you...

...just say it's like okay, why you knowlike? What's the reasoning, a the other thing is: Don't give a massive like tenpage pitches or like reason like here's. Why and here's all the things about myhistory? Here's! Why I did when I was a kid and a led me to where I am like allthat stuff is nice, but most of these people that you reach out to they'rebusy, like you, are sure, you're busy looking for guests, they're busy doingother things running a company or whatever might be that attracts you tothem, so you have to mindful and respectful the time the best thing youcan do and that this is what I've really taken like. This is how I wasable to get set goten as a perfect example I'll just share it. How I didthat, so I yeah I because a lot of people asked me like Imust have had thirty or forty people emaile be like. How did you do it like?How can I get him? Can you give me, is email, dress of peoplewere asking? Iwas like absolutely not like, so what I did is. I was actually looking becauseI know he publishes a lot of books. He's got nineteen best sellers orsomething like that, so I knew we DAVENAT noone coming out. I lookedaround to see I good find. I talking about it, I found one he mentioned thepractice coming out, so I looked around to find his publisher. Whoever he'sgoing to publish through found the publisher. Ask Them for a galley of it.Can I get a pre copy? I read the copy of the book and then not only that whatI did is. I actually knew another podcast. That is a much bigger podcast.I just happen to know like some of their PR team. I've never been on thepodcast or anything like that. Building a story Bran Mitdonald Miller, which isa really fantastic show, but oi love, Donar dolmayea amazing. So I actuallyreach out to their team and said: Hey. I don't know if you know, but Seth Gonis having a new book come out. You guys should consider having Im back on thepodcast. It's been a few years turns out the whole team had flipped over andnone of them knew Seph Goden. So I was like I found his email dress because byI was actually able to do a little bit research and find it so I sent them hisinformation. With his permission, I emailed him I D said Hey. I read yourgally I'd love to have you on the show. This is my favrite part about the book.Really brief. I must SAS must have been a hundred and twenty words like you canread it about thirty seconds I said. Also, can I please introduce you to theteam at storybrand. I think that they would love to have you on, and I got aresponse very quick. Actually let me take that back. I actually sent a videowith this and that's how I I told I wanted him on the show. I wrote up thepart about having him on the other...

...podcast so really like what I did was.I was a service to him and I helpe him get on two other podcast WHO's. Lookingfor an introduction to he just like hey, you know hse people. Could you help meout that too, and so as soon as we got on t on a on a Callat first thing said:Im he's like you have been beon helpful he's like. I cannot believe how willingyou were just to like help me like this I'd love to be on your show and I'llcome back later. If you want me to which wis really cool. So what I did, Iled with the value it wasn't like hey. I heard you a book I'd like to like totalk about it. I read the book here was ten things that really stood out to meabout. I love the chat with you about it. Here's what I think my audiencecound take from it Owin by the way, here's a really big podcast that wouldlike to have you on you want me tointroduce you to of them and that'skind of the whole flow I use with just that guess. So, for me it's alwaysindividual. I don't have a framework, but it always starts with leading withwith value and keeping it really short yeah. If, if there was a mikdrop momenton this podcast, I think that was it and I loved strategy that you used andthe theme here guys is be a catalyst and you could see that he mentioned his. His goal is to connect people and thepower of connection, and just by connecting seuthcod into and set Godenby. The way is historically an impossible person to get on a podcastor do a live event. I mean he is a really good person that saying nowat a thing so by icoming that catalyst and giving him value and then alsoletting him know that you had done some research. You had read the book, it'san amazing story and really impressive, and so then that guess was muchdeserved for you, because you had done you had circled. You know you hadcircled the guest and created a way to you know, empower him and that that 'sreally an amazing value bomb that if you're listening right now write thatdown become a catalyst. Okay, so moving right along you know, podcast interview etiquetteis also one of the things that you're sharing and podmatch, which Iabsolutely loved. Can you share a little bit about podcast interviewetiquette, because I know that there's people that show up and they'reunprepared or they...

...you know, maybe you're sending pooremails? Can you share a little bit about some etiquette tips that myaudience could put into their workflow yeah? So you know you is tha thepodcast host right, like we're talking to the host today, there's obviously awhole much longer list for the guest, but we're going to talk about the hosttoday for a host. What you want to do is youwant to make sure that first off somebody's comfortable, so you I neverstart off. Recording I've been on some podcast where, as soon as I joined,it's already recording the like hey, alex welcome to the PODCAST, I'm like,okay, you know like all right. I've actually had that like happened likefive or six times out of out of a hundred different podcast this year,and it's never super comfortable like assomeone who's been a guest enough like that. Doesn't really catch me off guardas much, but if I was brand new- and this was my first podcast or maybe evenmy tenth or Twentyeth- that would really freak me out as a guess. I'malready now you've got me already kind of flushshirt, so it's Gonnta be harderfor me to actually like gain composure and have a really good interview. So Ithink the best thing you can do is a host is as soon as you gat on leave afew extra minutes, not twenty or anything like that. But a few minutes Obe like hey we're going to start in them in, but real quick to have anyquestions. Okay, how LONL- and I always aske this question- is a reallimportant one? How long do I have you for how long do I have you for and thereason like that s that if they only have if they have a hard stuff, theyhave another podcast in thirty minutes and they start seing to hit two thsndyand twenty nine. You didn't ask that question the like: Oh shoot. How am Igoing to end this really fast and they start getting really short with theiranswers? N, IT'S NOT QUALITY! Now, if they say I've got thirty thirty minutesto be like hey, listen, we're going to go forabout twenty eight, but I promiseIm wont, keep you minute longer than that you now just they don't have tothink about that. They can think about the content. They're sharing. So for meas the host, I want my guest to be calm and to know that hey this is safeenvironment. I want you just to focus what you're sharing I'll handle therest and if it's somebody who's really new I'll, just tell him hey, sometimeslike the screen will go out what you actually do with me. You'relike it thequality, doesn't look good, don't let that Phasyou right like even said that,because sometimes when it's streaming it doesn't but later on it looks good.So I explain that sometimes the audio go out from minute or if it shuts down,don't worry, I can save everything we can just keep on going. It's not live.If you hate something just tell me we can edit it out like I go through. Allof that and again, the whole idea is kind of make this guest feel reallycomfortable and welcome, and actually recently got feedback and theopportunity to interview can't Kent.

Sorry, Kents blanking on this guys last night, Cettsomebody but anyway, sorry Ken he he came on the podcast and he asked me like a few questions aboutit and, like was just wondering, okay like what out this wot all this, and Iexplained all to him when we're done. He told his publicist who actuallyreached out to me and said he said you were the kindest podcaster he evertalked to like you made him feel really comfortable and really welcome, andthat was the goal like I wasn't like over the top and like kin, I bring yousome food like it was remote. You know like anything like that, but it was. Ireally did enough to make sure that people understood okay, here's theexpectation, here's what we're going for and, along with that, alwaysexplain the podcast a little bit. If they haven't heard it like, you can ask,most of them are going to say no and that's fine, but just just ask on theFlipsif you ever guess on a podcast go, listen to it at least a few episodesbeforehand. I think that's a really valuable thing to do, but yeah thoseare kind of some of my big tips. I'd have for this I'd say this. That's huge.I mean what I'm hearing here is treat your guest as, if they're a guest inyour home know. Sometimes you mantwould you like Aynhing to drink. U Make sureyou know where the bathroom is. You know make yourself at home, and Ireally love that that comfortability factor, because it also plays into somesome form of expectations. You know you need to Sey some expectations and sayhey hit. This is how the conversationis going to go. Just let them know acouple things about how you run your podcast and it makes for a much betterpodcast and I've been on so many podcasts, where at the very end theysay all right, here's the question you know, and they dropp this question thatyou weren't sort of expecting and they sort of put you on the spot. I think,if you have one of those like big monumental questions in your podcast,that you know before the podcast starts, let them know what the question is. Somaybe in the back of their head they can at least formulate some type ofanswer, because the worst thing that you can do is put somebody round in thespot and then there's dead air or the person feels uncomfortable, and Ireally love that. That's a huge tip, guys yeah! That's you ar bringing thenunger today, hey thanks man that one is reallyimportant my and with like hey.You have any final thoughts. Only tell people that, like you're saying exactlylike that, I tell them hey I'm going to...

...ask if you any final thought Atan, youcomfortable with that and most like. Oh yeah and they'll like quickly writesomething down or look at something, so they actually say it because whenthat's a common question that I hear on podcast and usually it's followed witha yeah yeah, I got something right likebecause they they're like. Oh that really. I wasn't thinking that way, butif you tell them that they're like cool, I got it and they seem super smart andthen obviously yeah ID's a lot more credibility but anyway and then yeah Imean H, t that's a really great! I'm glad you brought that up. Well, I justwrote down asking how much time they have, because that's not something I'vebeen doing, and I'm definitely going to add that in because I've been on theother side of that and I've felt rank sort of that pressure ever okay. Idon't want to be rude. How am I going to end this? I got to pick up my kids,but like theyl, the conversation is flowing so well that at's, notsomething you just want to completely cut off. So I'm absolutely adding thatinto my pre show ritual of having a shortconversation. Getting to nother person a little better, there's, actuallysomething called redlight fever, and when people see that red light, that'srecording its. This is from the music industry. When I was in the musicindustry, you could have a singer in front of a Mike and they're like okay,just warm up get used to the what you're going to do and then you're likeokay, I'm recording and they lose their mind because there's something thathappens when you're being documented, as opposed to when it's just a freeform conversation that people just tend to lock up. So I really like you know,I would never just start recording, because I know zoom automatically doesthat for people, but you need to have a little interaction right. This is alsogoing to be a BIGTIP, we're talking about networking and becoming acatalyst and- and it really sparked the thought of of this is anotheropportunity for you to become a catalyst before you start recordingyour interview is maybe saying you know. I think that you'd really be a greatconnection for this person and and asking if they', like that kind ofintroduction. Before the show and again that makes them feel more comfortable,you become more valuable and you'll probably have a much better interview.So this is really been amazing. I feel like you have brought so many powerfultips to my audience and I'm so grateful for that. You know you know you can find Alat, creating abrand podcast, of course, pod match...

...which will have links to all this inthe show notes and, of course, creating a brand. So I'd like you to talk moreabout creating a brand, because it's not something we spent a lot of time ontoday, but it's its really an amazing resource forpeople. Can you can you share more about what you're doing there yeah socreating a brand is the name of the podcast and creating a brandcom is thewebsite that goes along with it. So it's it's got the podcast on there.It's and it's got we're getting ready to start a video like a live version ofthe podcast. It's totally going to be separate things, so the videoll be onthere and then on. The last thing we have was just my blog, like I talkedabout my last day at my job and kind of the mindset I had to get into to makethat shift in the first place, and things like that. So it's all aroundhelpful content, and the last thing I do is I do fifteen minute. Stragegycalls with people, but really it's just an extension of the service that I loveto offer to people and my main business behind all that is. I do some somecoaching ad. I don't do a ton of it because I'm really focused on podmatchbut I'll, take on a few people here and there, if I really think I'm the rightperson to help, if not I'm helping pushing them to somebody that believeis right, but creating a brand. His definitely been the foundation of whatpod matches become and kind of. The name that I have in the industry hasall come from from this podcast and just you know, meeting people like youtraveis, along the way, has just been so helpful yeah. It's awesome, I'm super excitedto be connected to you and how would you like people to reach outto you if they'd like to find out more about you would or if they'd like tointerview you on their podcast? How would you like people to reach you yeah,so the easiest thing to do is everything. Is it creating a brandcom?I make it pretty easy, my social links and stuff like that are all on there.If you can spell my name, you can go to Alex San FELIPO. Tot COM Alex SanFilipocom Ma'ltake, you just raiht to my pod match profile and from there youcan click a button t to interview me. You can see some of the questions. Iusually answer and things like that and get an idea of what it looks like, butthose are realy the ways for Wele reach out to me, and you can find me justabout anywhere, I'm an open book. I love helping anybody a canse. Ifsomeone reaches out they're going to be in good hands, just make sure you. Letme know that you came from Travis, so I don't like cuss. You out or anythinglike that, I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't...

...do that WBOD, no wel again Alex. thank you so much. I'velearned so much today, and this is why I love having these conversations isbecause there's always so many people out there that are experimenting andlearning and sharing new things, which is everything I'm about on this podcastis sharing, what's working right now for podcasters to apply in their livesand Youve. Just I mean you blew my mind here with everything that you sharedtoday and I'm definitely going to check out the book that you reference thatindistractable book. So thank you so much for being a wealth of informationtoday on podcast therapy, and hopefully my listeners can realize that pot matchis going to definitely give them painless connections to the right,podcast guest and it's a free. You can try this out for free, so make sure yougo create an Account Watch. Some of the videos that Alex has put together toenable you to grow, find your voice grow. Your Audience Start Your ownpodcast revolution. Thank you. So much for coming on O podcast therapy. YeaTravis Tis like a dream, come true. I love the podcast and really enjoy whatyou're doing so. Thank you for having me.

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